Diversity News by Category

Archive for October, 2011

We Are a Culture, Not A Costume

Please read and share this interesting message about being mindful this Halloween of people using cultures as costumes.

As Halloween approaches, these posters are a great reminder.


Volunteers needed for Latino Youth Leadership Conference Nov. 5

The Latino Youth Leadership Conference is a day-long event organized by the Latin American Association and co-sponsored by Emory University whose goal is to encourage Latino middle and high school students to explore their options for higher education. It will take place at Emory University on Saturday, November 5, and will involve motivational speakers, information sessions, workshops, a College/Career Fair, and a host of fun activities (PRIOR REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR ALL ATTENDEES).

We are looking for additional volunteers — Emory undergraduates, graduate students, and staff — who would like to help with this inspiring and exciting event.  It’s a great opportunity for members of the Emory community to serve as hosts and guides to the hundreds of students, parents and teachers who will be on campus that day.  Spanish speakers are especially welcome (but you need not speak Spanish in order to volunteer). Shifts run from 7 am – 4 pm on Saturday.

If you are interested in volunteering, see the LAA website: www.thelaa.org <http://www.thelaa.org> . Follow the link for UPCOMING EVENTS / Latino Youth Leadership Conference / Registration Information / Register Online as a Higher Education Volunteer (for college students, faculty and staff). If you have questions, please contact kstolle@emory.edu or vhartfi@emory.edu

Honorary Degree Call for Nominations

Dear Colleagues,

 

I write to remind you that the Honorary Degree Committee welcomes faculty, staff, students, and alumni to submit nominations for distinguished candidates for an honorary degree from Emory University.  Nominations to be considered for the 2013 commencement and beyond must be submitted by November 10, 2011. Please encourage your constituents to nominate individuals who have achieved the highest distinction in their fields while also demonstrating a transformational impact.

 

Nominations may be submitted in one of three ways:

 

1.)    Submit online at:

http://www.emory.edu/secretary/secretarys_office/honorary-degrees/index.html

2.)  Email a nomination letter and supporting documents to honorarydegrees@emory.edu.

3.)  Mail nomination letter and supporting documents to Honorary Degree Nominations, Emory University, Office of the Vice President and Secretary of the University, Administration Building 407, Mail Stop # 1000/001/1AN, Atlanta, GA  30322.

 

All Honorary Degree Nomination Letters should address the following:

  • What are the nominee’s achievements that would merit this honor?
  • Why is it particularly fitting for Emory University to honor this nominee?
  • Would an honorary degree from Emory University have any special significance for this nominee?
  • Would the award have any special significance or meaning for graduating students?

Except in extraordinary circumstances, persons who have spent the greatest part of their careers as members of the Emory faculty or administration or those currently serving in US elective office are not considered.  The committee will, however, receive with interest nominations of persons otherwise associated with Emory such as alumni, distinguished visiting faculty, etc.  The committee encourages the nomination of individuals from diverse demographic backgrounds.

Nominations are kept active (i.e., considered each year) for a period of five years.  To review past honorary degree recipients and related information, visit the website:

http://www.emory.edu/secretary/secretarys_office/honorary-degrees/index.html

 

Sincerely,

 

Rosemary M. Magee, PhD

Vice President and Secretary of the University

Bring Your Own Lunch and Learn “Conflict Prevention, Managing and Resolution in a Multicultural Environment”

Faculty, Staff and Students
Join us for the viewing of a recorded discussion on conflicts by Gladis Benavidae. Cultural differences can be a source of conflict. Differing styles of communication, cultural dynamics and even individual life experience can lead to misunderstandings, natural tension and in the worst scenario, behavior that may be perceived as or is actually offensive. The ability to prevent, resolve and manage conflicts in a multi-cultural environment is a critical and
necessary skill. Come and explore some communication strategies to resolve conflicts.
Following the film, we will discuss the issues raised.

December 1, 2011
SOM 153A 11:45a–1:15p

Cookies and drinks will be provided!

 

Please register in PeopleSoft Self-Service
(Select “Learning and Development”; “Request Training Enrollment”; “Search By Course Name”; enter SOM; Choose ‘SOM Lunch and Learn’ from list and proceed with registration) If you have questions or trouble registering, contact Christie Kuropatwa
(ckuropatw@emory.edu).

Emory University encourages the full participation of individuals with disabilities in all aspects of campus living and learning. If accommodations are required, please contact Christie Kuropatwa (ckuropatwa@emory.edu) immediately so arrangements can be made.

Bring Your Own Lunch and Learn “LGBT Issues in Healthcare”

Faculty, Staff and Students
Join us for the viewing of a recorded panel discussion led by Kathy Oriel, MD, MS. Dr. Oriel is a past-president of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, an organization that advocates sensitive, high quality care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons and also advocates for LGBT physicians. Following the film, we will
discuss the issues raised.

*Note: There are some medically graphic descriptions.

 

November 1, 2011 SOM 153A 11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Cookies and drinks will be provided!
Please register in PeopleSoft Self-Service
(Select “Learning and Development”; “Request Training Enrollment”; “Search By Course Name”;
enter SOM; Choose ‘SOM Lunch and Learn’ from list and proceed with registration)
If you have questions or trouble registering, contact Christie Kuropatwa
(ckuropatw@emory.edu).

Emory University encourages the full participation of individuals with disabilities in all aspects of campus living and learning.

If accommodations are required, please contact Christie Kuropatwa (ckuropatwa@emory.edu) immediately so arrangements can be made.

Race & Difference Initiative’s “New Frontiers in Race and Difference Lecture Series”

This is a reminder that the Race & Difference Initiative’s “New Frontiers in Race and Difference Lecture Series” begins one week from today, October 31st. Please see attached flyers for information on speakers, times, and locations (also provided below).

Speaker: Pedro Noguera (NYU)
Title: “The Role of Research and the Politics of School Reform: Why What We Know Doesn’t Influence What We Do to Improve Our Nation’s Schools”
Date: Monday, October 31st
Time: 4:00pm
Location: Jones Room, Woodruff Library
*Light refreshments following talk

Speaker: John Wallace (University of Pittsburgh)
Title: “Homewood Children’s Village: Lessons Learned from the Comm-Univer-City of Pittsburgh”
Date: Thursday, November 3rd
Time: 4:00pm
Location: Oxford Road Presentation Auditorium, 1390 Oxford Road, Level 2

African Dance for Health and Well-Being, Mondays, November 7- December 12

The Carlos Museum is hosting a six-week class called African Dance for Health and Well-Being, taught by Emory dance affiliate Omelika Kuumba and members of Giwayen Mata, an all female African dance and drumming group.

 Mondays, November 7- December 12

5 – 6:30 p.m. Michael C. Carlos Museum, Reception Hall

African Dance for Health and Well-Being

For six Monday afternoons, the Carlos Museum invites you to dance to the rhythms of live African drums with Giwayen Mata. Move to the direction of Omelika Kuumba and members of this three-time winner of Creative Loafing’s Choice Award for Top Traditional/World Music and Dance group. Giwayen Mata will warm you up, work you out and cool you down with movements, rhythms, and songs as well as explain the cultural contexts for each dance. You are guaranteed to experience your muscles thoroughly and leave each session feeling revived and rejuvenated.

Fee: $60 for Museum members, $80 for non-members

To register, please contact Elizabeth Hornor at ehornor@emory.edu or 7-6118.